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Air Sierra
January 17th, 2009, 07:02 PM
1) Designate a trail boss. The trail boss should pick the tail gunner and if the group is large enough maybe a waist gunner as well. At the very least these three people should have communications with each other. If the group is large and has varied capabilities you might consider splitting into two seperate groups.

2) Have a driver's meeting where everyone introduces themselves everyone does not know each other. The trail boss should talk about what to expect for the day in terms of length (distance and time) and difficulty.

3) Alternate more and less capable vehicles and vehicles with and without winches if at all possible to keep the group moving through difficult sections.

4) The group should not split up if possible, but the trail boss should also make an effort to keep the group moving along. It seems that as group size increases time to get anywhere grows exponentially. If someone has a minor problem or needs to go to the bathroom or something I recommend that the tail gunner stay with them and the rest of the group keep moving. The stragglers should be able to catch up at the next difficult section.

5) If there are any forks in the road the trail boss should relay back to the waist gunner and tail gunner to let them know which way to go, and each if the group is all together each vehicle should stop and confirm that the vehicle behind them went the right way.

How is that for a start?

............

DRTY4x4
January 17th, 2009, 07:10 PM
What, no love?

Another good resource. Its probably the best writeup I've seen about the subject.
http://4wheeldrive.about.com/od/bran...adEtiquett.htm

Gizmatical Fuquad
January 17th, 2009, 07:31 PM
............

Can you Mods make that a sticky? :thumbsup:

DV8LADY2
January 17th, 2009, 08:11 PM
AS YOU KILL ME MAN!!! :D NO LOVE DUDE, NONE, NADA!

I worked really hard on my reply in that thread!!! lol j/k

It's cuz im a chick huh? :eek: ;)

MarkB.NV
January 17th, 2009, 08:12 PM
If we haven't chiseled this checklist in stone yet, I had offered this to another lister after the Genoa Peak run. I like the idea of a drivers meeting, trail boss, swapping phone numbers, rule setting, etc. Having clear expectations makes it a lot easier.


1. Each trail ride should have a designate leader (trail boss) that knows the trail or has current map / GPS for route finding, and a plan for the trip. Tail gunner brings up the rear and keeps track of any stragglers or over-taking traffic.
2. All participants are expected to stick to the trails, pick up your litter, close the gate, etc.
3. Participants need to help preserve our offroading rights - Be courteous to other trail users, hikers, MB riders, horseback riders, MC/ATV riders, other wheelers, etc.
4. If you go on the trail ride - stay with the group.
5. If you need to bail on the ride - you MUST notify another group member (somebody else on the ride). No sense in the group searching the mountain for you when you're already home sipping a cold one.
6. Groups larger than 10 rigs should split into 2 or more smaller groups -each with a designated leader and acknowledged plan.
7. Leaders need to lead from the front.
8. Beware the fork: When the trail comes to a split, stop and wait for the guy/gal behind you to catch up, and show them which way to go. Same rule for them.
9. Your rig needs an operational CB radio. NEVER use profanity on the radio.
10. Every participant is responsible for their own safety and welfare. A helping hand from other trail riders is always a nicety. But you drive your own rig, and you decide if you're up for the carnage.

Joe Momma
January 18th, 2009, 08:46 AM
So it was mentioned in another thread about the downhill vehicle getting out of the way when a rig is coming up the hill. Is this the accepted standard of courtesy? Also what about the little cow paths when you meet oncoming traffic who moves then?

leifnv
January 18th, 2009, 08:51 AM
So it was mentioned in another thread about the downhill vehicle getting out of the way when a rig is coming up the hill. Is this the accepted standard of courtesy? Also what about the little cow paths when you meet oncoming traffic who moves then?


Yes it is, the decending vehiclegive the right away.

The vehicle closest to a turnout backs up.

Actually, where I come from, it is the law...

This should beadded to the rules.... good point...

carbonunit
January 18th, 2009, 08:55 AM
So it was mentioned in another thread about the downhill vehicle getting out of the way when a rig is coming up the hill. Is this the accepted standard of courtesy? Also what about the little cow paths when you meet oncoming traffic who moves then?

I have always heard that the downhill vehicle should wait for the uphill traffic to pass. It is a momentum thing. It is easier to start going downhill that start going up in the middle. With that said I argued with a guy who always heard the opposite and I could never change his mind. He said it was easier for the uphill person to stop.

On a cowpath I have always followed the principal whoever gets to a wide spot first should pull over. I have had to backup on the road around Bowman Reservoir to get out of the way of people because I was closer to the wide spot.

With those thoughts in mind If the other rig is wheelin with their windows up and air on all bets are off. You should just expect they are not following any of these guidelines and expect you to stay out of their way. ;)

XXXXXXX
January 18th, 2009, 09:10 AM
I have always heard that the downhill vehicle should wait for the uphill traffic to pass. It is a momentum thing. It is easier to start going downhill that start going up in the middle. With that said I argued with a guy who always heard the opposite and I could never change his mind. He said it was easier for the uphill person to stop.

On a cowpath I have always followed the principal whoever gets to a wide spot first should pull over. I have had to backup on the road around Bowman Reservoir to get out of the way of people because I was closer to the wide spot.

With those thoughts in mind If the other rig is wheelin with their windows up and air on all bets are off. You should just expect they are not following any of these guidelines and expect you to stay out of their way. ;)

I think it is common sense. I'm sure all of you have been in a situation where you are the decending vehicle and there is NO way you could back up. Each situation dictates what happens.
If I'm decending, and can pull over, I will. Both vehicle have to be able to access the situation and accordingly.
If there is a large group coming down, I will pull over and let them pass.
If your vehicle can't get going again, you are probably somewhere you shouldn't be in the first place.

Brizzman
January 18th, 2009, 03:07 PM
With those thoughts in mind If the other rig is wheelin with their windows up and air on all bets are off. You should just expect they are not following any of these guidelines and expect you to stay out of their way. ;)

I wheel with the windows up and the air on a lot of the time. What's the point of having A/C if you don't use it when it's hot? :D

93FSB
January 18th, 2009, 03:17 PM
If your vehicle can't get going again, you are probably somewhere you shouldn't be in the first place.

I don't agree with that. I'm sure ALL of us here have climbed hills that if stopped, they would have to back down and try it again. Momentum is very important.

leifnv
January 18th, 2009, 03:40 PM
I wheel with the windows up and the air on a lot of the time. What's the point of having A/C if you don't use it when it's hot? :D
Whats the point of AC if youlive here and not in the humid midwest and south east?

Rizzo
January 18th, 2009, 03:47 PM
I never use A/C ... makes me sick. I prefer the fresh air ... but ... to each his own.

rusty_tlc
January 21st, 2009, 03:27 PM
One rule that seems to have been forgotten.
When you are blasting down a dirt road and see an oncoming rig both rigs should slow down enough that hey aren't kicking up a huge dust trail. There two reasons for this.

First the other rig may not have AC and it can suck to have the windows rolled up if it's hot. (I've actually had rigs blast by me when I was in my open top FJ40, they had no effing clue how much dust I ate.)

Second the dust can cause a temporary white out.

Years ago everybody did this but recently I haven't seen anybody doing it.

phildelfino
January 21st, 2009, 05:17 PM
Great website.

http://4wheeldrive.about.com/od/?once=true&

DBJ
January 21st, 2009, 05:27 PM
One rule that seems to have been forgotten.
When you are blasting down a dirt road and see an oncoming rig both rigs should slow down enough that hey aren't kicking up a huge dust trail. There two reasons for this.

First the other rig may not have AC and it can suck to have the windows rolled up if it's hot. (I've actually had rigs blast by me when I was in my open top FJ40, they had no effing clue how much dust I ate.)

Second the dust can cause a temporary white out.

Years ago everybody did this but recently I haven't seen anybody doing it.

That is a great point, i was coming back from the moonrocks a couple of weeks ago with the yota and my quad on the trailer, i was going slow anyway and pulled off to the side a little and stopped for a truck that was coming the other direction.........did he slow down..........no he sped up i think and just dusted the hell out of us:maddance:
Another one to add to the list i think.

leifnv
January 21st, 2009, 06:47 PM
That is a great point, i was coming back from the moonrocks a couple of weeks ago with the yota and my quad on the trailer, i was going slow anyway and pulled off to the side a little and stopped for a truck that was coming the other direction.........did he slow down..........no he sped up i think and just dusted the hell out of us:maddance:
Another one to add to the list i think.
Great point, should also apply to pedestrians we meet, no need to dust them down, or kill them with a rock your tires kick up....

Air Sierra
January 22nd, 2009, 09:18 PM
http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=treadlightlymonica&view=videos